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Former Texas Cop Surrendered after 13 years on the Run; Smuggled Marijuana across Southern Border and Fled to Mexico after getting Busted

Former Texas Cop Surrendered after 13 years on the Run; Smuggled Marijuana across Southern Border and Fled to Mexico after getting Busted

After evading authorities for over a decade, a former police officer has finally surrendered himself for allegedly smuggling marijuana through southern Texas.

Jose Omar Garcia and his brother, Roel Roberto Garcia, used to serve as police officers in Roma, a town located along the Texas-Mexico border.

In 2010, they, along with their father, were apprehended by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration during a task force investigation known as “Operation X-Men.”

An investigation focused on dismantling the infrastructure and transportation cells of a notorious drug cartel in the United States, particularly along the Southwest Border. This information was disclosed in a news release by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Texas in September 2010.

The brothers are said to have been involved in a conspiracy that reportedly included over 2,200 pounds of marijuana.

Following their arrest, the Garcia brothers managed to secure their release by posting bond. It is alleged that they subsequently fled to Mexico.

After evading authorities for over a decade, Jose Garcia, who is now in his 40s, surrendered himself on Monday as per Express-News.

Jose Garcia appeared before U.S. Magistrate Judge Nadia S. Medrano during a Wednesday hearing, with his family watching from the gallery.

Garcia patiently observed multiple hearings before his case was finally addressed, dressed in a casual blue jeans and shirt ensemble. During the incident, he seemed to exchange a subtle gesture with someone in the gallery.

Garcia’s attorney informed Medrano that his client’s brother, Roel Roberto Garcia, and his client’s father, Roel Garcia, have expressed their intention to surrender.

According to both the federal prosecutor and Jose Garcia’s attorney, the self-surrender had been planned for some time, although no further information was disclosed.

Medrano determined Garcia’s bond to be $100,000, requiring a $7,500 cash deposit. According to Medrano, it seems that the money he deposited in November 2010 before fleeing the country may be used to post bond, as it was not forfeited.

Garcia is required to stay at home in Roma while on bond. He is required to comply with GPS monitoring and is not allowed to leave the house without obtaining permission.

If found guilty, Jose Garcia could potentially be sentenced to a minimum of 10 years in federal prison.

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